Window Restoration A Practice in Mindfulness

Our most recent housemate moved out rather suddenly recently. It wasn’t because anything bad happened. He had stumbled across an opportunity that was just too good to pass up so we sent him off with our well wishes. With the room newly vacated I decided it was a good opportunity to restore the windows in there. This wasn’t originally on my to-do list for the spring, but, once we fill the room again I don’t know when I will get another chance.

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The New Window Color!

I have been working on restoring my first window for a bit now. It is hopefully the first of many as I plan to eventually restore them all. I recently had the project on hold for a bit, however, because I needed to decide what color to paint the outside sash and trim. This was a big decision as it will have a huge effect on the appearance and curb appeal of our house. You can see in the image below that the windows and trim (and all the limestone, yikes!) are painted white. While white is a classic choice I just don’t feel that it represents the direction that I want to go. I want a color that will be a sophisticated and modern take on a timeless look. Something that will differentiate the house from the rest of the homes on the street while still being aware and respectful of the context and history of the neighborhood.

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Letting Go of Perfect

Several weeks ago I went to a workshop hosted by Brick & Beam and led by Jim Turner of Turner Restoration that was all about restoring old windows. Restoring the windows in our house was something that I had been interested in and this workshop gave me the courage to give it a shot. I decided to start with the window in the bathroom that we are currently renovating. This involved removing the sashes and stripping them of paint and glazing and then reglazing and painting them. I decided that since I had the window all apart I might as well strip the jambs, sills, and trim too. I realized pretty early into this project that it was going to be a lesson in accepting the imperfect.

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